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20121101
20121130
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
day in washington today. you sort of expect after a national presidential election that you could get a few days of afterglow. let it all sink in with no big new things happening. maybe that was the way it went over the last couple of days. that definitely ended today starting with this. >> thank you. thank you, everybody. thank you. now that those of us on the campaign trail have had a chance to get a little sleep, it's time to get back to work and there's plenty of work to do. as i said on tuesday night, the american people voted for action not politics as usual. you elected us to focus on your jobs, not ours. and in that spirit, i've invited leaders of both parties to the white house next week so we can start to build consensus around the challenges that we can only solve together. at a time when our economy is still recovering from the great recession, our top priority has to be jobs and growth. that's the focus of the plan that i talked about during the campaign. >> president obama spoke publicly the night that he won his second term when he gave his basic victory speech in chica
. but it also raises questions about the way that big business wields its power in washington. how they wield their power and what they are capable of getting for themselves when they want something. i raise that question today in one specific context. we are at the moment when not just newly-elected senators, but incumbents are looking to get their assignments and what kind of work they are able to get done as senators. after the basic question of whether or not you can get elected, your assignment once you're in the senate is the most important thing about a senator's power in terms of what kind of impact you can have in d.c. if you want to influence policy in the senate, step one is get elected. step two is get on the right committees, and step three is try to take over your favorite committee. try to become the chair. both parties have their specific rules on how the assignments are made. the republicans have a term limit rule for being chairman or the top ranking republican on a committee. after six years, you have to roll over. you have to move on to a new place unless you can get a spe
.m. and then 1:00 a.m., we'll have california, hawaii, idaho, oregon, washington, and then the last poll closing in alaska. unless this is a very strange night, those races will be interesting for governors races and senate and house races and state issues, but not necessarily for the presidency. unless things go very, very differently than expected to go. this is how your election viewing is going to unfold hour by hour on tuesday night. if you just exclude the states for the presidential race where everybody pretty much knows exactly how it's going to go and just the states where there is some question as to what's going to happen, here is a clip and save thing for you about these states. the battlegrounds. all right? states that you know are going to be important and everybody thinks they're going to be close. these are the states everybody is going to be watching on tuesday night. each of these states, as you know, has a top elections official. and each of these states has a top elections official who is a partisan. who is either a democrat or a republican. and in a democracy, that should me
in washington state. there's san diego. there's tampa, florida in the st. petersburg area. there's baltimore, maryland. there's the virginia beach area, that metro area including norfolk. there is jacksonville, florida. and, of course, there is new orleans. so pop quiz. what do all of these large american cities have in common? you can cheat by looking at this map. what do all of these large american population centers have in common? the answer is that all of these major american cities are right on the edge of america. right on the coastal edge, up next to the sea. now, you could also add even some more major cities to this list if you wanted to. places like philadelphia or washington, d.c. or houston or providence, rhode island. those are all sort of coastal cities, too, in the sense that they are near the coast and they're on waterways. just for the sake of argument, let's not even include those. let's just be narrowly focused here, talking narrowly about big populous metropolitan areas that are right up against the sea. if you add up the population of these cities on america's coastal e
parpartisan gets in washington. and a little more than a month ago, they issued a report on tax policy. they found there is no connection between lowering the tax rates on millionaires and billionaires and creating economic growth. there's no evidence that if you cut taxes on the rich that that makes the economy grow. that's a problem because that is essentially mitt romney's whole reason for living. this is the republican party's economic reason for existing. if you cut taxes on the rich, the job creators, that will jump start the economy. this is the whole basis of the party' economic philosophy. this is why congressional republicans pledge their first born children to a man named grover. and here comes this highly respected agency that says it turns out the whole thing is bunk. giving rich people a tax break doesn't help the economy but it sure does help rich people. what do you do if you're the republican party? you pressure the agency into burying the report which sp exactly what republicans in congress did this fall. the "new york times" is reporting that the congressional resear
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)